CDC suggests new steps in fight against coronavirus

Image Source: Flickr user Andrew Domone All adults (18+) under the age of 65 who have recently traveled to countries where the virus is active will be required to receive an immunization for coronavirus…

CDC suggests new steps in fight against coronavirus

Image Source: Flickr user Andrew Domone

All adults (18+) under the age of 65 who have recently traveled to countries where the virus is active will be required to receive an immunization for coronavirus infection.

Public Health England reported that 1,427 infections with the novel coronavirus (NCoV) had been reported by individuals since the first reported case in June 2013.

The virus is circulated by camelids (Bacteroides felis and type I guinea fowl, for example), which include domestic and wild camels, llamas, llamas-forage, alpacas, ruminants such as cows, goats, and goats, and other livestock animals such as sheep, pigs, and poultry.

Exposure to the virus may occur from contact with an animal or a person, or from handling their faeces or fluid; infections in humans may also occur after exposure to an animal that has been exposed to NCoV.

NCoV infection in the elderly is rare and potentially fatal. Circumstances of infection for those aged 65 and over include:

Viral illness lasting one week or less with fever, cough, shortness of breath, loss of appetite, and chills, or

Severe illness lasting for at least three weeks with fever, cough, cough, and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

A link to previous infections with the flu or norovirus infection; therefore these persons may be at risk of developing severe infection.

Antimicrobial treatment with supportive therapy is generally recommended for serious conditions that have occurred in the prior three weeks, but will not be recommended for short-term (

Any NCoV-associated infection in the past twelve months or current cardiac issues will not be treated with antibiotics and lifestyle changes may also not be appropriate.

“This second amendment to the CIRCULATION (Cotes-Claire) T-recommendation is part of the Ministry of Health’s response to the continued rapid global spread of NCoV,” Dr. Allison McGeer, head of infection control at Public Health England, said. “We are fully aware that there may be people who are undergoing treatment for severe respiratory disease who should not receive an NCoV vaccine. However, this has been informed by the accumulated evidence across both research and clinical trials.”

McGeer also pointed out that the Department of Health will be providing advice to local health authorities in partnership with the National Pandemic Flu Service that will enable them to tailor their delivery of the recommended vaccine to suit their local circumstances.

“We are well aware that some clinicians and healthcare workers do not welcome immunization or like the idea of being told what to do,” McGeer said. “However, this measure has the support of the National Pandemic Flu Service – the NHS Dr. Mary Ramsay Reference Unit to ensure that targeted care is provided to adults and children who have recently travelled to countries where the virus is active, for example the UK Overseas Territories. The aim is to protect the public.”

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