‘It’s a Thank You to the Women’: March of Dimes President Backs Up Resume for Possible 2020 Nomination

One in every 10 babies in the United States live to see their first birthday, but new research shows that the nation is making progress when it comes to reducing the number of live…

'It's a Thank You to the Women': March of Dimes President Backs Up Resume for Possible 2020 Nomination

One in every 10 babies in the United States live to see their first birthday, but new research shows that the nation is making progress when it comes to reducing the number of live births early in pregnancy.

A new report released by the March of Dimes said that the nation’s infant mortality rate dropped slightly in 2018, marking the ninth straight year of a decrease in that category.

Of the approximately 5,500 premature births reported nationwide in 2018, 30 percent were attributed to higher blood pressure or lipid levels, the April 29 report says.

Since 2000, the infant mortality rate for black infants has decreased nearly 50 percent, according to the report.

When the rate for high blood pressure or lipid levels is increased, mother-to-child deliveries occur within 30 days of their first full-term birth, according to the March of Dimes.

U.S.Cantor’s New Federal Mission: To Fight Disease of Millions

“The report that we released today is the culmination of all of the good work over the past couple years,” March of Dimes President Colleen Kraft said. “It’s really a victory lap, but it’s really a much deeper and more intentional work than a mere victory lap.”

Kraft noted that the high fat content rates don’t just impact the child who suffers a premature birth, but also when the child grows up.

“There’s evidence now showing that high lipid levels have very serious impacts on not only the child who is born prematurely, but the child who goes on to grow up and have a productive life,” Kraft said.

The report found that while the overall rate dropped, the rate of abnormally early births spiked an alarming 53 percent between 2009 and 2010.

“Part of it is associated with better health care to pregnant women,” Kraft said. “Part of it is related to even the lower rate of smoking by pregnant women — something we’ve been working on for quite some time. We have a program called S.T.E.A.M. which stands for Sufficient, Timely, Educated, Employed — the program now affects a lot of women.”

High cholesterol or blood pressure is considered pre-eclampsia in pregnancy. As such, Kraft said the March of Dimes is offering women a free prescription blood pressure test during pregnancy.

“We have seen a reduction in the number of women reporting pre-eclampsia, which is nice,” Kraft said. “It’s a thank you to the women for taking ownership of their health in pregnancy.”

Catch the full news segment on “America’s Newsroom” above.

Leave a Comment