These are the most bizarre airplane incidents ever caught on video

There were 51,419,000 landings in the U.S. last year, according to U.S. Department of Transportation statistics. Nearly 95 percent of those took place safely. Oftentimes air travel isn’t much fun, but the safety angle…

These are the most bizarre airplane incidents ever caught on video

There were 51,419,000 landings in the U.S. last year, according to U.S. Department of Transportation statistics. Nearly 95 percent of those took place safely.

Oftentimes air travel isn’t much fun, but the safety angle is something for which most travelers are grateful.

In fact, a 2016 study from the Council on Foreign Relations found that a majority of Americans would gladly pay a fee to increase the safety of commercial air travel.

Travel isn’t without its bumps, however. Recent photos from Twitter show some farcical airplane incidents.

Twitter user @P_raussi shared two photos of seemingly frozen combs that had fallen from a flight on board a long-haul British Airways flight bound for Dubai.

Footage taken during a flight from Ecuador captured one of the most frightening airplane landings ever, as the the plane deviated abruptly from its flight path and made a parachute-like landing.

An engine on a DC-10 aircraft near Long Beach made contact with a shipping container at around 30,000 feet. Both aircraft went down after the incident, and one plane captain reported minor injuries. The landing was uneventful.

A St. Louis-bound Southwest flight on May 7, 2017, took off from Phoenix on its final approach before landing in Arizona. Flight crew saw a small oil slick emerging off the coast of Spain before the plane was forced to make an emergency landing.

Another Southwest flight from Montana to San Diego was forced to make an emergency landing on a Nevada runway due to a significant electrical malfunction that caused the plane to unexpectedly lose cabin pressure.

American Airlines Flight 16 from Milan to Philadelphia made an emergency landing after the plane’s air conditioning system malfunctioned at around 30,000 feet, Bloomberg reported. Crew members first noticed cold air had infiltrated the interior of the cabin at 11:30 a.m. local time, but later noticed the air was much colder than normal. That led them to ask that the aircraft return to the gate.

FAA data shows that more than 54 million flights took place worldwide in 2015, and during the next three years.

It may be a tempting choice but only 30 million flights make it to the end of the day each year.

Perhaps that number will be significantly increased one day.

In the meantime, enjoy the beautiful images of potential scary airplane landings posted on Twitter.

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