WWII relics found in neo-Nazi home

Written by Staff Writer Natalia Raluca Dragoi, CNN Over a five-year period in the 1990s, the hidden museum found at an extremist neo-Nazi’s home boasted a cache of weapons capable of bringing down a…

WWII relics found in neo-Nazi home

Written by Staff Writer

Natalia Raluca Dragoi, CNN

Over a five-year period in the 1990s, the hidden museum found at an extremist neo-Nazi’s home boasted a cache of weapons capable of bringing down a civil airliner or cause major carnage during a modern-day Black Mass.

The building in Vlodrop, in northern Austria, was full of weapons, including a Soviet AK-47, AK-74 M and machine guns.

The objects were found when the house was raided on April 30 and the 79-year-old’s son was arrested.

The house belonged to the now-deceased man’s son’s brother, Austrian prosecutors confirmed to CNN.

Slobodan Dragoi, a neo-Nazi and member of the National Socialist Underground, in this 2009 surveillance photograph. Credit: Quirin Sammut/Keystone-France/REX/Shutterstock

The man has now been placed in administrative detention.

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Prudential Chiang was one of around 80 neo-Nazis convicted of being a member of the far-right National Socialist Underground in Austria over the course of a five-year period between 2008 and 2013.

The group was accused of 10 murders and a bomb attack on a Turkish newspaper in Vienna.

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European rights authorities have called for the group to be the subject of a European Criminal Court investigation.

“To the best of our knowledge, the criminal investigation took place in 2015, but after that, the crime probe was ‘shifted’ to the Austrian Security and Intelligence Service in February 2017, and has then been handed over to the state prosecutor for special investigation in Liefering,” said Paolo Nicolai, a spokesman for Austria’s security and intelligence service.

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The National Socialist Underground, also known as the “RAT organization,” first came to the attention of law enforcement in 1992.

Uwe Mundlos and Beate Zschaepe were convicted in 2007 of killing five people. When the two were arrested in 2011, police said the pair was responsible for the killing of an immigrant and two Turks dating back to 2001.

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